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"It is clear that the chief end of mathematical study must be to make the students think."—John Wesley

 

Jada Webb, class of 2017 

 

 

 

01-21-19

to

 01-25-19  

 

 

HELLO, students and parents!

 

This is the 19th week of school and the 3rd week of the 3rd 9-weeks grading period. 

 

A reminder that if any student is absent, they are expected to watch the video of that day’s lecture, found either on the YouTube link on their math page or in the shared google folder, so that they are up to speed when they return.  Also, I am in my classroom each morning at 8:00 AM for tutorials (Wednesday duty, though, at 8:20 AM.)

Caring Achievers Reach Excellence

 

“Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.”

 

 —Martin Luther King, Jr.

PreAP Precal

MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 2019

We will:

MLK DAY

MLK DAY

I will:

MLK DAY

MLK DAY

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

We will:

Apply angles to rotational situations §5.2

I will:

Compute angular velocity of a spinning object

 

WED, JANUARY 23, 2019

We will:

Graph circular trigonometric functions  §5.3

I will:

Develop the Unit Circle and the trig functions

 

THUR, JANUARY 24, 2019

We will:

Graph circular trigonometric functions  §5.3

I will:

Develop the Unit Circle and the trig functions

 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2019

We will:

Graph circular trigonometric functions  §5.3

I will:

Develop the Unit Circle and the trig functions

 

 

AP Calculus AB

MONDAY, JANUARY 21 2019

We will:

MLK DAY

MLK DAY

I will:

MLK DAY

MLK DAY

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2019

We will:

Find inflection values of a function §3.4

I will:

Create a number line chart to determine sign changes of f”.

 

WED, JANUARY 23, 2019

We will:

Analyze relations among f, f’, and f”  §3.5

I will:

Sketch a graph of f and f” from a graph of f’

 

THUR, JANUARY 24, 2019

We will:

Analyze relations among f, f’, and f”  §3.5

I will:

Sketch a graph of f and f” from a graph of f’

 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2019

We will:

Find optimal values using differential calculus  §3.6

I will:

Find the absolute max mins of real life applications

 

 

AP Calculus BC

MONDAY, JANUARY 21, 2019

We will:

MLK DAY

MLK DAY

I will:

MLK DAY

MLK DAY

 

TUESDAY, JANUARY 23, 2019

We will:

Integrate by pattern recognition & u-substitution §4.4

I will:

Find an antiderivative and indefinite integral

 

WED, JANUARY 23, 2019

 We will:

Integrate by pattern recognition & u-substitution §4.4

I will:

Find an antiderivative and indefinite integral

 

THUR, JANUARY 24, 2019

 We will:

Integrate by pattern recognition & u-substitution §4.4

I will:

Find an antiderivative and indefinite integral

 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2019

We will:

Solve differential equations using calculus §5.1

I will:

Find a particular solution to a differential equation

 

 

 

Academic All-State

 


 

Monday, January 21st

  • No School! Student Holiday!

 

Tuesday, January 22nd

  • 4:05 - Campus Report Card Presentation room 203
  • 7:00 - Boys Basketball vs. Canyon (home)
  • 7:00 - Girls Basketball vs. Canyon (away)
  • 7:15 - Girls Soccer vs. Dripping Springs (away)

 

Wednesday, January 23rd - AM Assembly Schedule

  • STUCO Blood Drive all day
  • 11:15 - Senior Assembly about Scholarships

 

Thursday, January 24th

  • Tennis vs. San Marcos
  • 6:00 - Dual Credit meeting for all interested parents in library
  • 6:30 - Wrestling vs. Canyon (home)

 

Friday. January 25th

  • Men's Golf at Hill Country Invitational
  • 5:00 - Wrestling vs. Madison/Reagan (at Reagan)
  • 7:00 - Boys Basketball vs. East Central (away)
  • 7:00 - Girls Basketball vs. East Central (home)
  • 7:15 - Girls Soccer vs. Canyon (home)
  • 7:15 - Boys Soccer vs. Canyon (away)

 

Saturday, January 26th

  • Men's Golf at Hill Country Invitational
  • Swim District Meet at Blossom in SA
  • Wrestling at CC Veteran Memorial Tournament in Corpus
  • 10:00 - Softball Scrimmage (home)

 

 

 

NBHS Athletics Calendar

Big picture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MATH BIO:

Galileo Galilei (1564 – 1642) Born in Pisa, Italy, Galileo pioneered "experimental scientific method" and was the first to use a refracting telescope to make important astronomical discoveries.

In 1609 Galileo learned of the invention of the telescope in Holland. From the barest description he constructed a vastly superior model. Galileo made a series of profound discoveries using his new telescope, including the moons of the planet Jupiter and the phases of the planet Venus (similar to those of Earth's moon).

As a professor of astronomy at University of Pisa, Galileo was required to teach the accepted theory of his time that the sun and all the planets revolved around the Earth. Later at University of Padua he was exposed to a new theory, proposed by Nicolaus Copernicus, that the Earth and all the other planets revolved around the sun. Galileo's observations with his new telescope convinced him of the truth of Copernicus's sun-centered or heliocentric theory.

Galileo's support for the heliocentric theory got him into trouble with the Roman Catholic Church. In 1633 the Inquisition convicted him of heresy and forced him to recant (publicly withdraw) his support of Copernicus. They sentenced him to life imprisonment, but because of his advanced age allowed him serve his term under house arrest at his villa in Arcetri outside of Florence.

Galileo's originality as a scientist lay in his method of inquiry. First he reduced problems to a simple set of terms on the basis of everyday experience and common-sense logic. Then he analyzed and resolved them according to simple mathematical descriptions. The success with which he applied this technique to the analysis of motion opened the way for modern mathematical and experimental physics. Isaac Newton used one of Galileo's mathematical descriptions, "The Law of Inertia," as the foundation for his "First Law of Motion."

Galileo became blind at the age of 72. His blindness has often been attributed to damage done to his eyes by telescopic observations he made of the Sun in 1613. The truth is he was blinded by a combination of cataracts and glaucoma. Galileo died at Arcetri in 1642—the year Isaac Newton was born.

 

MATH FACT:

Maybe the most famous scientific experiment is Galileo Galilei's dropping objects from the leaning tower of Pisa in order to prove that all objects fall at the same rate, whatever their mass.

 

Galileo realized, even during his earliest studies (published in his book On motion) that the speed of a falling body is independent of its weight. He argued as follows: suppose, as Aristotle did, that the manner in which a body falls does depend on it weight (or on some other quality, such as its ``fiery'' or ``earthy'' character), then, for example, a two pound rock should fall faster than a one pound rock. But if we take a two pound rock, split it in half and join the halves by a light string then one the one hand this contraption should fall as fast as a two pound rock, but on the other hand it should fall as fast as a one-pound rock. Since any object should have a definite speed as it falls, this argument shows that the Aristotle's assumption that the speed of falling bodies is determined by their weight is inconsistent; it is simply wrong.

Two bodies released from a given height will reach the ground (in general) at different times not because they have different ``earthliness'' and ``fiery'' characteristics, but merely because they are affected by air friction differently. If the experiment is tried in vacuum any two objects when released from a given height, will reach the ground simultaneously (this was verified by the Apollo astronauts on the Moon using a feather and a wrench).

 

This result is peculiar to gravity; other forces do not behave like this at all. For example, if you kick two objects (thus applying a force to them) the heavier one will move more slowly than the lighter one. In contrast, objects being affected by gravity (and starting with the same speed) will have the same speed at all times. This unique property of gravity was one of the motivations for Einstein's general theory of relativity.

 

Also in his investigations of falling bodies Galileo determined that the acceleration of these bodies is constant. He demonstrated that an object released from a height starts with zero velocity and increases its speed with time (before him it was thought that bodies when released acquire instantaneously a velocity which remained constant but was larger the heavier the object was). Experimenting with inclined planes, and measuring a ball's positions after equal time intervals Galileo discovered the mathematical expression of the law of falling bodies: the distance increases as the square of the time.

 

MATH QUOTE: 

All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered; the point is to discover them.”Galileo Galilei

 

“You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him discover it in himself.”—Galileo Galilei

 

LIMERICK:

Galileo's experiment worked because the air is sufficiently thin. Who knows what he would have concluded if we lived in a thicker medium...

 

What would you have thought, Galileo,
If instead you dropped cows and did say, "Oh!
To lessen the sound
Of the moos from the ground,
They should fall not through air but through mayo!"

Have a great week,

Kevin W. Korpi

 

2005 District Teacher of the Year

2015 Region 13 Teacher of the Year

 

New Braunfels High School

www.korpisworld.com

kkorpi@nbisd.org

 

 

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Mathematics is not a careful march down a well-cleared highway, but a journey into a strange wilderness, where the explorers often get lost. Rigour should be a signal to the historian that the maps have been made, and the real explorers have gone elsewhere.--W.S. Anglin

 

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Caricatures done by Thomas Korpi

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