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"It is clear that the chief end of mathematical study must be to make the students think."—John Wesley

 

Jada Webb, class of 2017 

 

 

 

11-05-18

to

 11-09-18  

 

 

HELLO, students and parents!

 

This is the 12th week of school and the 4th week of the 2nd 9-weeks grading period.  This is also THE LAST WEEK OF SCHOOL BEFORE OUR WEEK-LONG THANKSGIVING BREAK!!!  IN OTHER WORDS, THERE IS NO SCHOOL NEXT WEEK, SOMETHING ELSE FOR WHICH TO GIVE THANKS!!!

 

A reminder that if any student is absent, they are expected to watch the video of that day’s lecture, found either on the YouTube link on their math page or in the shared google folder, so that they are up to speed when they return.  Also, I am in my classroom each morning at 8:00 AM for tutorials (Wednesday duty, though, at 8:20 AM.)

Caring Achievers Reach Excellence

 

quote of the week

 

"Try not to become a person of success, but rather try to become a person of value."

—Albert Einstein

 

 

This week in the classroom . . .

PreAP Precal

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2018

We will:

Explore properties of logarithmic functions. §4.3

I will:

Sketch a graph of a transformed log equation and list properties.

 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

We will:

Explore properties of logarithmic functions. §4.3

I will:

Sketch a graph of a transformed log equation and list properties.

 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14,  2018

We will:

Explore properties of logarithmic functions. §4.3

I will:

Sketch a graph of a transformed log equation and list properties.

 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2018

We will:

Use logs to make molehills out of mountains. §4.4

I will:

Manipulate an expression with factors and exponents with logs.

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2018

We will:

Use logs to make molehills out of mountains. §4.4

I will:

Manipulate an expression with factors and exponents with logs.

 

 

AP Calculus AB

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2018

We will:

Learn how and when to differentiate implicit equations §2.7

I will:

Calculate a derivative using implicit differentiation.

 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

We will:

Learn how and when to differentiate implicit equations §2.7

I will:

Calculate a derivative using implicit differentiation.

 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14,  2018

We will:

Learn how and when to differentiate implicit equations §2.7

I will:

Calculate a derivative using implicit differentiation.

 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2018

We will:

Learn how to differentiate inverse functions §2.8

I will:

Calculate a derivative of an inverse function.

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 09, 2018

We will:

Learn how to differentiate inverse functions §2.8

I will:

Calculate a derivative of an inverse function.

 

 

AP Calculus BC

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2018

We will:

Use the MVT to prove the existence of a slope §3.2

I will:

State and use the Mean Value Theorem to prove slopes.

 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2018

We will:

Use the MVT to prove the existence of a slope §3.2

I will:

State and use the Mean Value Theorem to prove slopes.

 

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14,  2018

We will:

Use the MVT to prove the existence of a slope §3.2

I will:

State and use the Mean Value Theorem to prove slopes.

 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2018

We will:

Use the 1st Derivative test to find local extrema §3.3

I will:

Find and test critical values of a function for local extrema.

 

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2018

We will:

Use the 1st Derivative test to find local extrema §3.3

I will:

Find and test critical values of a function for local extrema.

 

 

 


 

This week on campus . . .

Monday, November 12th

  • 6:00 Cheer Booster Meeting in library
  • 6:30 Evening with the Counselors for Sophomore and Junior Parents in auditorium
  • 6:30 Boy's Basketball parent meeting in competition gym
  • 7:00 Board Meeting at Education Center

 

Tuesday, November 13th

  • 8:00 - Parent meeting with Counselors for Sophomore and Junior Parents in library (same presentation as the Monday night meeting)
  • 5:00 - Swim Tri Meet against Steel/East Central at Das Rec
  • 6:00 - ROTC Parent Meeting in library
  • 7:00 - Boy's Basketball vs. Southwest Legacy (home)
  • 7:00 - Girl's Basketball vs. Roosevelt (away)

 

Wednesday, November 14th - Advisory Schedule

  • Fundamental 5 Recognize and Reinforce Training during conference periods in L106 - all classroom teachers required to attend during your conference period
  • Men's Golf at Clark Fall Scramble
  • Signing Day
  • 4:15 - HOSA Meeting in library
  • 6:30 - Wrestling Blue/Gray Dual (home)

Thursday, November 15th

  • Unannounced Lock Down Drill
  • 8:00 - Google Classroom training in library
  • JV Boy's Basketball Tournament at NBHS
  • Varsity Girl's Basketball Tournament in Marble Falls

 

Friday, November 16th

  • Fat Friday!!!
  • Varsity Girl's Basketball Tournament in Marble Falls
  • 7:00 - Varsity Boy's Basketball vs. Seguin (home)

 

Saturday, November 17th

  • JV Boy's Basketball Tournament at NBHS
  • Varsity Girl's Basketball Tournament in Marble Falls

 

 

NBHS Athletics Calendar

Big picture

 

Big picture

 

MATH BIO:

Eratosthenes (276-194 BC) was a Greek mathematician, astronomer, poet, athlete, geographer, and professional librarian.  As the chief librarian of the Library of Alexandria (the center of all knowledge of the day), he made several discoveries and inventions including a system of latitude and longitude and musical scales.  His other contributions include the following:

 

  • The Sieve of Eratosthenes as a way of finding prime numbers.
  • The measurement of the Sun-Earth distance, now called the astronomical unit (804,000,000 stadia, 1 stadion varies from 157 to 209 meters).
  • The measurement of the distance to the Moon (780,000 stadia).
  • The approximate angle of the tilt of the earth.
  • He compiled a star catalogue containing 675 stars, which was not preserved.
  • A map of the Nile's route as far as Khartoum.
  • A map of the entire known world, from the British Isles to Ceylon, and from the Caspian Sea to Ethiopia.
  • Invented the leap day.

 

He was ALSO the first Greek to calculate the circumference of the earth (with remarkable accuracy).  Eratosthenes was also the founder of scientific chronology; he was the first to try to arrange historical events in chronological order.  We still use his dates for most of ancient history. 

 

In his time, the known world extended from Spain to India.  Eratosthenes believed that a vast ocean covered the rest of the world.  If it weren’t for the enormity of the ocean, he thought it would be possible to sail from Spain to India by heading west.  It was this idea that inspired Christopher Columbus to undertake his famous voyage in 1492.

 

Other scientists during his time nicknamed him “Beta,” and it wasn’t because he was the coolest guy in his fraternity.  Eratosthenes had so many interests that his contemporaries considered him a dabbler; to them, he was second-class, a beta (although Eratosthenes turned it around by saying he was the “second best” in any field during his time.)

 

MATH FACT:

How did Eratosthenes approximate the circumference of the earth?  Pure genius.  Eratosthenes knew of a special well near Syene, Egypt.  At noon on June 21st, the longest day of the year (summer solstice), the sun’s rays penetrated all the way to the bottom of the well, meaning that the sun was directly overhead.  He realized that if the sun was directly overhead in Syene, then its rays must be hitting at an angle in Alexandria, which was due north (same meridian).  If he could measure the angle by which the sun was off center, then he would have the clue he needed to extrapolate the size of the earth.  So, at noon on June 21 in Alexandria, he took a measuring stick and captured the angle cast by its shadow.

 

Eratosthenes knew that the angle of the shadow was equivalent to the angle formed by the two cities and the center of the earth.  So, he divided the size of that angle by 360, the number of degrees in a circle, to determine the fraction of the earth that separated the two cities.  The answer was one-fiftieth.  In other words, if you walked back and forth between Syene and Alexandria fifty times, then you would have walked the equivalent of the earth’s circumference.

 

All that remained was to measure the precise distance between the two cities.  For this, Eratosthenes hired a pacer, a professional walker trained in taking perfectly equal steps.  From the measurements of the pacer (about 5,000 stadia), Eratosthenes estimated the circumference of earth to be 24,700 miles.  Today, using the exact same principles developed by Eratosthenes 2,000 years ago, modern instruments estimate the distance around the equator to be 24,902 miles.

 

Here’s a nice video describing the process as explained by Carl Sagan.  Got 7 minutes?

 

MATH QUOTE: 

[Eratosthenes] ... is a mathematician among geographers, and yet a geographer among mathematicians; and consequently on both sides he offers his opponents occasions for contradiction.—H.L. Jones, geographer, circa 1917

 

Are you SURE you took equal steps and kept good count?  Remember, I’m waiving your library fine of 3 drachma for your overdue book “How to walk and chew gum at the same time.”—Eratosthenes to his hired pacer upon his return

 

LIMERICK:

Alexandria's polymath Greek
Read from shadows' small angles, oblique
To a tower at noon
(21st day in June),
The whole size of the Earth—so to speak!

 

AND

 

The Greek Eratosthenes

Found with the greatest of ease

The actual girth

Of our great planet earth

Plus or minus a couple degrees.

 

 

Have a great week,

Kevin W. Korpi

 

2005 District Teacher of the Year

2015 Region 13 Teacher of the Year

 

New Braunfels High School

www.korpisworld.com

kkorpi@nbisd.org

 

 

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Mathematics is not a careful march down a well-cleared highway, but a journey into a strange wilderness, where the explorers often get lost. Rigour should be a signal to the historian that the maps have been made, and the real explorers have gone elsewhere.--W.S. Anglin

 

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Caricatures done by Thomas Korpi

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